“If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.”
--Audre Lorde

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Critical Pedagogy and Library Instruction Report Back

Writing after a thorough brain workout at the Critical Pedagogy and Library Instruction session held here at home base in the Brooklyn College Library yesterday.

Ira Shor, presenting the first portion of our event, was really enlivening. I appreciated how he infused discussions of class, social consciousness and context into all what he spoke about. A few notes that I jotted down from his talk follow below.

Bloggers Throughout Time and Space

I just clicked over to the Utne Reader for this post: Rare Photo of Early 20th Century Bloggers

The Rights of Readers and the Threat of the Kindle

Today is our first talk about readers' rights and ebooks, at the LACUNY Emerging Technologies event at Baruch College. I thought folks might be interested in the website that Matt and I have created to store information about our talks (as well as the presentation slides): it's over at readersbillofrights.info

Are you going?


I'm thinking of trying to swing it...

Documenting Struggle Redux: Radical New York City Archives

http://radicalreference.info/radicalarchivesredux

Radical Reference presents a second evening about how community history is documented and celebrated. Archivists and activists will present parts of their collections and discuss how their work keeps the struggle alive. (Details about our first "Documenting Struggle" can be found at http://radicalreference.info/radicalarchivesevent.)

Monday, April 26
7:30pm
Brecht Forum
451 West St (between Bank & Bethune Sts), NYC
$6/10/15 sliding scale (no one turned away)

April 23rd LACUNY Program: Electronic Books and Electronic Readers: Emerging Issues and Questions

Title: Electronic Books and Electronic Readers: Emerging Issues and Questions
Sponsor: The LACUNY Emerging Technologies Committee
Date: Friday, April 23rd
Time: 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Location: CHANGED ROOM! Baruch College Vertical Campus--room 11-150 on the 11th floor.

Speakers & Presentations

*******************
Alycia Sellie & Matthew Goins - Brooklyn College

"The Rights of Readers and the Threat of the Kindle"

Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods

This might be a *little* late, but Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods is out(!), and my copy is on the way(!), and you can get your own here(!).

This is definitely one of my most highly anticipated library texts to come out post MLS!

Upcoming Events

Lots of upcoming news and events for the Spring semester, most notably:

I'll be speaking with Matthew Goins at two upcoming events about eBooks and readers' rights:

I'll be participating in ACRL's Immersion Teacher Track program this Summer in Burlington, Vermont. I wrote in my application that I am
interested to examine how critical pedagogy fits into library instruction, so I am excited to see how this can be discussed within the larger frameworks of the program. I'm also excited to get the chance to focus on teaching for a bit and to share what I learn with my colleagues.

And finally, I am really excited to be a part of the upcoming Center for the History of Print Culture in Modern America's Library History Seminar XII: Libraries in the History of Print Culture. I can't wait to hear Janice Radway speak and to spend some time in Madison talking about print culture (whilst also enjoying some New Glarus!).

Queens Librarian Talk

Jenna and I will be presenting "Zines 101" tomorrow at the Queens Public Library. I'm excited to spend some time looking at works with our librarian audience as an attempt to define them (an illustration of my DIY Zine Definition). For slides you can see Jenna's post.

CHANGED DATE! - Critical Pedagogy and Library Instruction Event

Library Association of CUNY Instruction Committee Spring Event "Critical Pedagogy and Library Instruction"

Saturday, May *8*, 2010
Brooklyn College Library
1:00pm-4:00pm

This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP by April 9th via the webform at: http://tinyurl.com/ycj239j

Click through for more details...

Get a copy of The Borough is my Library/Biblioball Zine!

For all of you who may not be able to make it to the Biblioball on Friday night, you can now order a copy of The Borough is my Library zine through paypal! Complete with silkscreen covers and special inserts! Proceeds go to Literacy for Incarcerated Teens: http://www.literacyforincarceratedteens.org/LIT/Welcome_.html

You can order a copy online here.

Click through for contact info for mail and international orders*

*If you would like to order a copy via the mail email alycia(at)brokenja(dot)ws for mailing address and further details, or to get a quote for additional shipping costs for international orders.

The Borough is my Library Debut!

The Borough is my Library: A Greater Metropolitan Library Workers Zine

An exploration of the bibliographic undergrowth of New York City through the eyes of those at work in independent libraries, academic institutions and in the streets. Featuring day-in-the-life comics created by zine librarians, narratives of those who started their own collections from scratch, and other works that explore library microcosms within the city. With works by members of the ABC No Rio Zine Library, Books Through Bars, Branch Project, Radical Reference, Reanimation Library and more!

Copies available on a sliding scale $3 – $7. All profits go to Literacy for Incarcerated Teens. Other issues available online here.

Due to demand, I'm now in the second printing of issue #1, which means that if you place an order, I'll send you an entirely black and white version (as pictured above).


The Borough is My Library #1




Contents of The Borough is my Library Vol.1 No.1:

  • Branch: Libraries as Public Space Interventions/Jerome Chu
  • The Work of the Zine in the Age of Social Networking/Jack Z. Bratich
  • A Day in the Life of a Reference + Zine Librarian in New York City: March 24, 2009/Jenna Freedman
  • Books Through Bars/Victoria Law
  • Kathleen Hanna and Riot Grrrl Archives/Kate Angell
  • The Cataloging Department/Suckzoo Han
  • Radical Reference/Melissa Morrone
  • Solace Among the Stacks/Eric Nelson
  • Reanimation Library/Andrew Breccone
  • Paperdoll Librarian/Caitlin Quinn
  • (portions of) East Village Inky/Ayun Halliday
  • Also: Reprints from Synergy, ed. by Celeste West



Donate Art for ABC No Rio Clothesline Benefit

Dear Artist--

ABC No Rio, the Lower East Side gallery and arts center, is planning another of our Clothesline Benefit Art Sales to raise money for our Building Fund.

The event will take place on December 10th and 11th. We are asking artists who support ABC No Rio to participate by donating work.

Work should be no larger than 11" X 17", and limited to two works per artist. All work will be presented on clotheslines strung through No Rio's gallery space, and should be unframed, two-dimensional work.

Shirley Chisholm Day Still to Come

The Shirley Chisholm Day celebration was great!*

What I discovered was that there is an official holiday in the state of New York dedicated to Shirley Chisholm, but that it is on November 30th each year, Chisholm's birthday. So there is still more celebrating to come this year!

Shirley Chisholm Day

Tuesday, November 24th is Shirley Chisholm Day.

Even if you don't live in Bed Stuy, visit my post office or go to Brooklyn College, I think it would do us all good to reflect a bit tomorrow on the spirit and vigor that Chisholm embodied. "Be a catalyst for change."

Currently Reading

Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric



Alycia's favorite books »

Daily Reading Log

August 31 2014

  • Lauren Berlant's article, "'68 or Something," (Critical Inquiry, Vol. 21, No. 1 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 124-155): "This essay is written in favor of refusing to relinquish utopian practice, of refusing the apparently inevitable movement from tragedy to farce that has marked so much of the analysis of social movements generated post '68. I meant to place '68 in a scene of collaborations and aspirations for thinking, describing, and theorizing social change in the present tense, but a present tense different from what we can now imagine for pragmatic, possible, or useful politics." 125-126.
  • Freeland, Cynthia A. "Feminist frameworks for horror films." Post-theory: Reconstructing film studies (1996): 195-218. Such a great find for that project I'm trying to revive.

August 20-21, 2014

  • Yesterday morning, started Lauren Berlant's article, "'68 or Something," (Critical Inquiry, Vol. 21, No. 1 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 124-155) because it had been cited by Cvetkovich in her footnotes, and really enjoyed the very first part. Still working on it.
  • Yesterday afternoon, serendipity reminded me to how little I know about Ralph Bunche, so started Ralph Bunche: Model Negro or American Other? by Charles Henry. There a quick way to explain who Bunche was--the first African American to win the Nobel prize--but he was so much more, and yet is still a relatively overlooked historical figure.

August 19, 2014

  • The intro to Ann Cvetkovich's An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures on the train this morning. Didn't read any more because I wanted to be sure to go back and make note of a few portions, and to be sure to put a few things from the bibliography on my reading list.

August 14, 2014

  • Bonnie Gordon's paper, "Towards Open Metadata and Bibliographic Data." A really useful summary of all the issues surrounding open linked data for libraries!

August 5, 2014

August 4, 2014

August 3, 2014

  • A snippet from today's reading: "Foucault disdained photocopying which, he told a friend, destroyed the charm of a text, 'which becomes almost lifeless when you no longer have the printed page before your eyes and in your hands.'" (from Steven Maynard's article, "Police/Archives")

May 28, 2014

  • Still in the beginning chapters of Eileen Myles' Inferno (a poet's novel), & loving it.

April 19, 2014

April 14, 2014

  • Last night heard the intro to Mark Maron's Attempting Normal and I really liked how he talked about what books are on his shelves (the titles surprised me, actually--I think we've got many of the same to-reads) and all the pieces of paper and bits of his life surrounding him in the garage.
  • "A Canon Without Balls," review by Sady Doyle, from In These Times, a photocopy of said article from Sandy Berman, which makes me want to read No Regrets: Three Discussions (which it looks like very few copies have entered into libraries yet, which feels like a joke when combined with getting info about it from Sandy...)
  • Continuing with the thick little Lydia Davis story comp. Feels like something someone should have prescribed to me to read. Everyone recommends it, so maybe as much as it could have been prescribed, it was.
  • Yesterday I also skimmed through a history of another building where I used to work, looking for some pieces that weren't there. Recently I had read a piece about a different library building's history where I used to occasionally work, and that account was pretty sad (hopes were higher then for a better future).

April 11, 2014

  • Started The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis today and this is something that makes me want to make a note about. Crisp and real.

April 1, 2014

  • Reading Poor People and Library Services, edited by Karen M. Venturella today. It's bittersweet; I'm glad that this book exists, but I worry that in the time since it was published that things have only gotten more dire. It's also very haunting to read pieces that are hopeful about libraries you later saw in not-so-hopeful states.

March 29, 2014

  • On a Mr. Rogers binge
  • Poked my way through Informed Agitation, but carefully read Jude Vachon's "Inside and Outside of the Library: On Removing Barriers and Connecting People with Health Care Resources and Zines." I told her it is a reminder of the librarian I want to be. Highly recommended for so many reasons, most of all for lots of good ideas about how librarians can be helpful in connecting people to information, especially in situations where Jude stepped in and shared information when her community might not have thought to ask for a librarian's help.
  • Also a smattering of articles by and from Molly Fair about community archives: including work by Mary Stevens, Elizabeth Shepherd, Andrew Flinn, Eric Ketelaar, Joan Nestle, Jeannette Bastian.

March 26, 2014

  • Started Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun on the train this morning. My copy has someone else's notes in it, and I can't help from reading their marginalia. Except I can't figure out if these notes are just that--notes--or disagreements with the text. In some instances they seem to summarize, but in others they're more reactionary. Lots of the notes just say "Google." (So that should tell you a bit about what kind of book this is.)
  • More about that OCLC report: Bethany Nowviske's response as well as Dot Porter's.